Hadas Stein, CPA and her amazing staff!

E-mail Print PDF

(818) 461-8900

HadasSteinCPA.com

13261 Moorpark Ave., Sherman Oaks, CA 91423

Would you like more from your accountant? Are you getting the best and most accurate information to help you achieve the goals you’d like?

We recently interviewed a CPA who could possibly save you more money than you may ave imagined!

Offering patience and a non-judgmental approach – Hadas will travel to your locationto help you with any of your accounting needs. Her specialty is working with small business and startups that need organization, training and an accounting system that won’t frustrate them. Hadas and her team work with QuickBooks – both Windows & MAC, and provide bookkeeping & tax solutions for small to medium businesses and individuals. All business types, including entertainment, elder care, non-profits and trusts. Hadas also works with individuals who could benefit from the her years of experience with taxes, trusts and more!

Ten IRS Tips to Help You Choose a Tax Preparer

Many people pay to have their taxes prepared. You need to be careful when you pick a preparer to do your taxes. You are legally responsible for all the information on the tax return even if someone else prepares it. Here are 10 IRS tax tips to help you choose a tax preparer:

1. Check the preparer’s qualifications. All paid tax preparers are required to have a Preparer Tax Identification Number or PTIN. The IRS will soon offer a new Directory of Federal Tax Return Preparers with Credentials and Select Qualifications on IRS.gov. You will be able to use this tool to help you find a tax return preparer with the qualifications that you prefer. The Directory will be a searchable and sortable listing of certain preparers with a valid PTIN for 2015. It will include the name, city, state and zip code of:

Attorneys.?CPAs.?Enrolled Agents.?Enrolled Retirement Plan Agents.?Enrolled Actuaries.?Annual Filing Season Program participants.

2. Check the preparer’s history. You can check with the Better Business Bureau to find out if a preparer has a questionable history. Check for disciplinary actions and the license status for credentialed preparers. For CPAs, check with the State Board of Accountancy. For attorneys, check with the State Bar Association. For Enrolled Agents, go to IRS.gov and search for “verify enrolled agent status.”

3. Ask about service fees. Avoid preparers who base their fee on a percentage of your refund or those who say they can get larger refunds than others can. Always make sure any refund due is sent to you or deposited into your bank account. You should not have your refund deposited into a preparer’s bank account.

4. Ask to e-file your return. Make sure your preparer offers IRS e-file. Any paid preparer who prepares and files more than 10 returns generally must e-file their clients’ returns. The IRS has safely processed more than 1.3 billion e-filed tax returns.

5. Make sure the preparer is available. You need to ensure that you can contact the tax preparer after you file your return. That’s true even after the April 15 due date. You may need to contact the preparer if questions come up about your tax return at a later time.

6. Provide tax records. A good preparer will ask to see your records and receipts. They ask you questions to report your total income and the tax benefits you’re entitled to claim. These may include tax deductions, tax credits and other items. Do not use a preparer who is willing to e-file your return using your last pay stub instead of your Form W-2. This is against IRS e-file rules.

7. Never sign a blank tax return. Do not use a tax preparer who asks you to sign a blank tax form.

8. Review your return before signing. Before you sign your tax return, review it thoroughly. Ask questions if something is not clear to you. Make sure you’re comfortable with the information on the return before you sign it.

9. Preparer must sign and include their PTIN. Paid preparers must sign returns and include their PTIN as required by law. The preparer must also give you a copy of the return.

10. Report abusive tax preparers to the IRS. You can report abusive tax preparers and suspected tax fraud to the IRS. Use Form 14157, Complaint: Tax Return Preparer. If you suspect a return preparer filed or changed the return without your consent, you should also file Form 14157-A, Return Preparer Fraud or Misconduct Affidavit. You can download and print these forms on IRS.gov. If you need a paper form by mail go toIRS.gov/orderforms to place an order.

 

Here are six tips that you you need to know about the home-office deduction.

1. Regular and Exclusive Use. As a general rule, you must use a part of your home regularly and exclusively for business purposes. The part of your home used for business must also be:

Your principal place of business, or a place where you meet clients or customers in the normal course of business, or a separate structure not attached to your home. Examples could include a garage or a studio.

2. Simplified Option. If you use the simplified option, you multiply the allowable square footage of your office by a rate of $5. The maximum footage allowed is 300 square feet. This option will save you time because it simplifies how you figure and claim the deduction. It will also make it easier for you to keep records. This option does not change the criteria for who may claim a home office deduction.

3. Regular Method. If you use the regular method, the home office deduction includes certain costs that you paid for your home. For example, if you rent your home, part of the rent you paid may qualify. If you own your home, part of the mortgage interest, taxes and utilities you paid may qualify. The amount you can deduct usually depends on the percentage of your home used for business.

4. Deduction Limit. If your gross income from the business use of your home is less than your expenses, the deduction for some expenses may be limited.

5. Self-Employed. If you are self-employed and choose the regular method, use Form 8829, Expenses for Business Use of Your Home, to figure the amount you can deduct. You can claim your deduction using either method on Schedule C, Profit or Loss From Business. See the Schedule C instructions for how to report your deduction.

6. Employees. If you are an employee, you must meet additional rules to claim the deduction. For example, your business use must also be for the convenience of your employer. If you qualify, you claim the deduction on Schedule A, Itemized Deductions.


Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner

Our Consumer Reporters

Sandra Siepak

Sandra Siepak is our newest Host and Consumer Reporter for Best Deals TV. Sandra brings a wealth of hosting, reporting,...

Debra Mark

Debra Mark is very excited to be part of Best Deals TV Show. She is a seasoned news anchor in Los Angeles. She was an an...

AJ Vittone

Having spent the past 20 years as on-air talent in the broadcast television news industry, AJ comes to Best Deals with ...

Lindsay Myers

Lindsay Myers is a new mother of two and has been a valued reporter for Best Deals TV Show for many years.  She has m...

Lynda Halligan

Lynda Halligan is an international TV personality and journalist best known for hosting, producing and writing "Hollyw...

Sheryl Kahn

Sheryl Kahn is an Emmy award winner who reported for Fox stations and CNN bureaus in Los Angeles and Chicago, as well a...